Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
HSOC 003-401 TECHNOLOGY & SOCIETY BENSON, ETIENNE TR 1200PM-0130PM Technology plays an increasing role in our understandings of ourselves, our communities, and our societies, in how we think about politics and war, science and religion, work and play. Humans have made and used technologies, though, for thousands if not millions of years. In this course, we will use this history as a resource to understand how technolgoeis affect social relations, and coversely how the culture of a society shapes the technologies it produces. Do different technologies produce or result from different economic systems like feudalism, capitalism and communism? Can specific technologies promote democratic or authoritarian politics? Do they suggest or enforce different patterns of race, class or gender relations? Among the technologies we'll consider will be large objects like cathedrals, bridges, and airplanes; small ones like guns, clocks and birth control pills; and networks like the electrical grid, the highway system and the internet.
    Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
    HSOC 010-001 HEALTH & SOCIETIES MCKAY, RAMAH MW 0200PM-0300PM "Two fundamental questions structure this course: (1)What kinds of factors shape population health in various parts of the world in the twenty-first century? and (2)What kinds of intellectual tools are necessary in order to study global health? Grasping the deeper "socialness" of health and health care in a variety of cultures and time periods requires a sustained interdisciplinary approach. "Health and Societies: Global Perspectives" blends the methods of history, sociology, anthropology and related disciplines in order to expose the layers of causation and meaning beneath what we often see as straightforward, common-sense responses to bioloogical phenomena. Assignments throughout the semester provide a hands-on introduction to research strageties in these core disciplines. The course culminates with pragmatic, student-led assessments of global health policies designed to identify creative and cost effective solutions to the most persistent health problems in the world today."
      Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
      HSOC 100-401 Introduction to Sociological Research SMITH, HERBERT MW 0100PM-0200PM One of the defining chnaracteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitmenmt to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projets utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strenths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research.
        SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
        HSOC 102-401 BIOETHICS CRNIC, MEGHAN MW 1200PM-0100PM This course is intended to introduce students to the fundamental principles of bioethics and the many ethical issues that arise in the rapidly changing fields of biomedicine and the life sciences. The first half of the course will provide an overview of the standard philosophical principles of bioethics, using clinical case studies to help illustrate and work through these principles. In the second half of the course we will focus on recent biomedical topics that have engendered much public controversy including diagnostic genetics, reproductive technologies and prenatal screening, abortion, physician assisted suicide, human experiments, and end of life decision making. We will use the principles learned in the first half of the course to systematically think through these bioethical issues, many of which affect our everyday lives.
          SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
          HSOC 111-401 HEALTH OF POPULATIONS ELO, IRMA MW 1100AM-1200PM This course develops some of the major measures used to assess the health of populations and uses those measures to consider the major factors that determine levels of health in large aggregates. These factors include disease environment, medical technology, public health initiatives, and personal behaviors. The approach is comparative and historical and includes attention to differences in health levels among major social groups.
            SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
            HSOC 112-001 THE PEOPLES HEALTH BARNES, DAVID TR 1030AM-1200PM While the scary threats of the moment in recent years, Ebola, MERS, swine flu, bioterrorism dominate media coverage of public health, most human suffering anddeath are driven by more mundane causes. This course critically addresses twenty-first-century public health science and policy by examining the long history (beginning with the plague epidemics of Renaissance Italy) that brought us to where we are today. Topics include responses to epidemics; socioeconomic, racial, and other disparities in health; occupational health; the rise of public health as a field of scientific inquiry; sanitary reform; the Bacteriological Revolution; the shift from disease causes to risk factors; and the social determinants of health.
              SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
              HSOC 202-401 SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION VOELKEL, JAMES R 0130PM-0430PM During the 16th and 17th centuries, something that resembled modern science emerged from something that did not. Though the nature and cause of that transition are contested, there were unquestionably many pivotal developments in the content and conduct of science, and it is in this period that many of the 'founding' figures of science, from Copernicus to Galileo to Newton, are identified. This course will examine the many elements that went into the transition, including the revolution in cosmology, the revolt against ancient natural philosophy, the rise of experimentalism, the new philosophies of inquiry, new social structures for natural inquiry and the conceptual foundations of classical physics.
                HSOC 209-401 Race and Gender in Global Science GIL-RIANO, JUAN T 0130PM-0430PM This course critically examines the creation of scientific conceptions of 'race' and 'sex' in the modern era and their global impact. How did 'race' and 'sex' come to be the primary categories through which human variation has been classified in the modern West? What concepts of "race" and "sex" did colonial scientists, doctors, naturalists, and other experts invent, and how and why did they do this? How have scientific conceptions of 'race' and 'sex' been adapted to fit the sociopolitical projects of formerly colonized regions? And how have recent developments in genomic science sought to reinvent these categories? With these questions in mind, this course challenges us to think critically about the political contexts in which conceptions of 'race' an'sex' have been crafted as well as how they have been contested and re-defined.
                  HSOC 230-301 FUNDMTLS OF EPIDEMIOLOGY PINTO-MARTIN, JENNIFER TR 0900AM-1030AM This course introduces students to the basic tenets of epidemiology and how to quantitatively study health at the population level. Students learn about measures used to describe populations with respect to health outcomes and the inherent limitations in these measures and their underlying sources of data. Analytic methods used to test scientific questions about health outcomes in populations then are covered, again paying particular attention to the strength and weaknesses of the various approaches. Multiple large epidemiologic research and field studies are used as in-class exemplars.
                    HSOC 251-301 FOUNDA OF PUBLIC HEALTH: Foundations of Public Health SORENSON, SUSAN MW 0330PM-0500PM Many factors have shaped, and continue to shape, population health and public health policy. This course will explore the concept, mission, and core functions of public health. Students will have a chance to learn about its key methodological (epidemiology, biostatistics) and content (environmental health, social and behavioral sciences, health policy) areas. In addition, we will focus on topics of particular relevance to the current health of the public; topics likely will include the basics of life (food, water, and shelter) and topics of current interest (e.g., motor vehicle crashes, mental health, violence).
                      HSOC 259-601 INTR COMPLE & ALTERN MED MACKENZIE, ELIZABETH MW 0500PM-0630PM This course will introduce the student to the field of complementary of and alternative medicine (or CAM). In addition to providing an overview of several common modalities and systems currently used in the U.S., the course will explore such topics as health belief systems, spirituality and health, ethnomedicine, the holistic paradigm, the social context of health, healthcare as a cultural construct, and the contemporary emergence of integrative medicine. I invite students to approach the subject matter with open-minded skepticism.
                        HSOC 260-301 SOC DETERMINANTS HLTH: Social Determinants of Health JOHNSON, ANDRIA TR 0300PM-0430PM Over the last century, we have witnessed dramatic historical change in population health, e.g. rising numbeers of obese Americans and dramatic declines in death from stomach cancer. There has also been highly visible social patterning of health and disease, such as socio-economic disparities in AIDS, substance abuse, and asthma in the U.S. to day or the association of breat cancer with affluence around the world. This course will explore the way researchers and others in past and present have tried to make sense of these patterns and do something about them. The course is historical and sociological. We will examine evidence and theories about how poverty, affluence and other social factors influence health AND we will examine how social and historical forces shape the ways in which health and disease are understood.
                          HSOC 275-401 MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY SCHNITTKER, JASON MWF 1000AM-1100AM This course is designed to give the student a general introduction to the sociological study of medicine. Medical sociology is a broad field, covering topics as diverse as the institution and profession of medicine, the practice of medical care, and the social factors that contribute to sickness and well-being. While we will not cover everything, we will attempt to cover as much of the field as possible through four central thematic units: (1) the organization of development of the profession of medicine, (2) the delivery of health-care, (3) social cultural factors in defining health, and (4) the social causes of illness. Throughout the course, our discussions will be designed to understand the sociological perspective and encourage the application of such a perspective to a variety of contemporary medical issues.
                            Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR
                            HSOC 335-401 HEALTHY SCHOOLS SUMMERS, MARY M 0200PM-0500PM This academically based community service research seminar will develop a pilot program to test the efficacy of using service-learning teams of undergraduates and graduate students to facilitate the development of School Health Councils (SHCs) and the Center for Disease Control's School Health Index (SHI) school self-assessment and planning tool in two elementary schools in West Philadelphia. This process is intended to result in a realistic and meaningful school health implimentation plan and an ongoing action project to put this plan into practice. Penn students will involve member sof the school administration, teachers, staff, parents and ocmmunity member sin the SHC and SHI process iwth a special focus on encouraging participation from the schools' students. In this model for the use of Penn service-learning teams is successful, it will form the basis of on ongoing partnership with the School District's Office of health, Safety & Physical Education to expand such efforts to more schools.
                              CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                              HSOC 338-401 Hybrid Science: Nature, health, and society in Latin America GIL-RIANO, JUAN R 0130PM-0430PM What role did science and medicine play in the creation and growth of the Spanish and Portuguese empires? And why was the creation of science and health institutions crucial to the revolutionary movements for independence in Latin America? This course examines science and medicine in Latin America by attending to the ways that knowledge of nature and health has been central to the political struggles of the countries in this region. A crucial dynamic shaping the history and culture of this region is the interplay between the healing practices and cosmologies of European settlers, indigenous Americans, and the descendants of African slaves. Bearing this interplay in mind, this course explores how Latin America has been a fertile site of scientific creativity. It also examines the ways in which Latin American scientists and medical experts have refashioned concepts and practices from Europe and North America to fit local circumstances.
                                HSOC 370-401 THE MANY LIVES OF DATA BERGMAN, JAMES TR 0300PM-0430PM This is a class about the live(s) and afterlives of information from 1850 to the present. Not only can information be reproduced (in a variety of material conditions); it can be repurposed and funneled through a variety of different applications, some of them serving radically different purposes than the first purpose of gathering it. Thoreau's journals of plant flowering, for instance, have become important indicators of climate change. More controversial is the sale of biomedical information by personal genomics services for drug discovery, or the construction of forensic databases consisting of the DNA of suspects arrested as a result of racial profiling. We will study the ways in which data has become a way for us to understand and define change, stability, place, and time, beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, a period of accelerated and increasingly systematic gathering of data,particularly medical, forensic, and environmental data. The class will proceed both chronologically and thematically in three units, from the gathering and use of biomedical data as a way to make patient populations "legible" (to borrow from James Scott), to data as a way to make the environment understandable, and finally to data as a tool for producing and reproducing social relations. As a final project, students will trace a particular data set from its original gathering to its latest usage. Students will also have an opportunity to create their own course content in the final three weeks of class.
                                  HSOC 411-401 SPORT SCIENCE & MEDICINE JOHNSON, ANDRIA TR 1030AM-1200PM Why did Lance Armstrong get caught? Why do Kenyans win marathons? Does Gatorade really work? In this course, we won't answer these questions ourselves but will rely upon the methods of history, sociology, and anthropology to explore the world of the sport scientists who do. Sport scientists produce knowledge about how human bodies work and the intricacies of human performance. They bring elite (world-class) athletes to their laboratories-or their labs to the athletes. Through readings, discussions, and original research, we will find out how these scientists determine the boundary between "natural" and "performance-enhanced," work to conquer the problem of fatigue, and establish the limits and potential of human beings. Course themes include: technology in science and sport, the lab vs. the field, genetics and race, the politics of the body, and doping. Course goals include: 1) reading scientific and medical texts critically, and assessing their social, cultural, and political origins and ramifications; 2) pursuing an in-depth The course fulfills the Capstone requirement for the HSOC/STSC majors. Semester-long research projects will focus on "un-black-boxing" the metrics sport scientists and physicians use to categorize athletes' bodies as "normal" or "abnormal." For example, you may investigate the test(s) used to define whether an athlete is male or female, establish whether an athlete's blood is "too" oxygenated, or assess whether an athlete is "too" fast (false start). Requirements therefore include: weekly readings and participation in online and in-class discussions; sequenced research assignments; peer review; and a final 20+page original research paper and presentation.
                                    HSOC 420-301 HSOC SEMINAR: Research Seminar Health and Society CRNIC, MEGHAN R 0130PM-0430PM This course is designed to provide HSOC students with the tools necessary to undertake original research, guiding them through the research and writing process. Students will produce either a polished proposal for a senior thesis project, or, if there is room inthe course, a completed research paper by the end of term. Students work individually, in small groups and under the close supervision of a faculty member to establish feasible research topics, develop effective research and writing strategies, analyze primary and secondary sources, and provide critiques of classmates'drafts. Students must apply for this couse by December 1.
                                      PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                      HSOC 454-401 MILITARY MEDICINE & TECH CARUSO, DAVID TR 0130PM-0300PM War and its effects on the human body are brutal; the carnage of the battlefield and the conditions of camp life have presented special challenges to medicine throughout history. People and governments have sought to quell carnage and deter war through the development of ever-more-lethal technologies, though, in the end, they mostly created more spectacular ways of maiming flesh. But the significance of medicine and technology in a military context extends well beyond the injuries and illnesses of war. Looking more closely at the ways in which engineers, physicians, inventors, military officers, soldiers, and civilians have interacted with each other both in war and in peace reveals much about the political, cultural, and disciplinary formation of military medicine and technology in the modern era. This seminar surveys the history of medicine, technology, nursing, innovation, and public health as they are conducted in a military context, exploring the ways in which the practices, theories, tools and imagined needs of the military have played, and continue to play, a prominent role in conceptualizations of warfare morality, the body, and ethics.
                                        HSOC 482-401 INVISIBLE LABOR HUM SCI: Invisible Labor in the Human Sciences KAPLAN, JUDITH MW 0200PM-0330PM This course looks at those disciplines that take people as their subjects of research--including biology and biomedicine as well as anthropology, linguistics, and sociology--to explore the contributions of a wide range of research participants. We will focus on the sciences of human behavior, information, and medicine to analyze the labors of behind-the-scenes actors including tissue donors, survey respondents, student subjects, patients, translators, activists, ethics review boards, data curators, and archivists. Our job will be to analyze the experiences of these technoscientific laborers with a view to systems of knowledge and poer in the production and maintenance of knowledge about humans and their bodies.
                                          HSSC 517-301 GENDER & TECH KNOWLEDGE: Gender and Technical Knowledge LINKER, BETH
                                          LINDEE, MARY
                                          T 0130PM-0430PM In this graduate reading seminar, we explore how technical knowledge systems have historically intersected with identity and social order. The materials emphasize gender, but our discussions and readings will also engage at times with disability, race, class and other social categories that have shaped participation in technical endeavors and been the focus of technical study. Our goal is to understand how embodiment and expertise intersect. We will explore why certain kinds of people have been understood to be unreliable knowers, pathologically embodied, untrustworthy, or dangerously linked to emotion, incompetence or confusion, while other kinds of people have been socially marked as embodying reliability, trustworthiness, or epistemological neutrality. These embodiments bear on the historical development of technical knowledge as a social system for the establishment of consensus about the nature of reliable truth. They are also relevant at many different levels to embodied social experiences of scientific information, personal health, reproduction and everyday technology. This course will give students the tools and insights needed to draw on feminist/gender/queer theory when it is useful to their research. That is the purpose of all of our readings. We begin with an exploration of some key ideas in feminist scholarship of the last few decades. Then we turn to three broad, interconnected queries, relating to the social organization of science, technology and medicine (who has been excluded, who favored? What kinds of work have been understood to belong to different kinds of people?); to the intellectual content of expertise (how have experts made technical sense of social and bodily difference? How have technologies expressed and performed gender?); and to the philosophical debate about the nature of technical knowledge, particularly science, as a fundamentally gendered (masculine) endeavor which privileges hierarchical explanations in ways that mimic the social order.
                                            UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                            HSSC 530-402 SEM IN AMER ARCHITECTURE WUNSCH, AARON
                                            BARNES, DAVID
                                            W 0900AM-1200PM This seminar will challenge students to encounter and interpret the city around around them in unconventional ways. At a time when public commemoration has vigorously and sometimes violently re-entered our country's public discourse, we wish to re-examine how monuments, memory, politics, and our senses shape our understandings of Philadelphia's past, present, and possible futures. Our focus is on two intertwined themes: How we remember and What we remember. Treating monuments, films, and historical texts as key forms of interpretation - the building blocks of an official if unstable "public past," we will likewise attend to the "backdrop" of such written and built statements: everyday urban and domestic life as well as more public histories that have remained silent or risen to the surface at key moments.
                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                              HSSC 565-301 ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY BENSON, ETIENNE W 0200PM-0500PM A survey of recent and influential works in environmental history, including works from both within and outside the American environmental history canon. The focus is on situating emerging historiographical trends within the long-term development of the field and in relation to other closely allied fields, including the history of science, technology, and medicine, social and cultural history, urban history, agricultural history, world history, historical ecology, environmental anthropology, and ecocriticism.
                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                HSSC 667-301 CAPITALISM: THEORY ECON: Capitalism: Theorizing economy in sci & med MCKAY, RAMAH R 0130PM-0430PM What are the relationships between capitalism and the practice and experience and experience of medicine? How have historians and anthropologists theorized capitalism and political economy in accounts of health and medicine? What do such theories account for and what is foreclosed? This research seminar examines theories of capitaliem as they are taken up in historical and ethnographic accounts of science, health, healing, and medicine. Exploring how contemporary and classic accounts have sought to analyze and unpack the relationship between economy and health, we will examine how political economic approaches to health and medicine have informed historical and ethnographic accounts of health and illness -- asking, for instance, how theories of neoliberalism have been used to explain health inequalities (and vice versa) -- and will analyze how scholars have linked practices of financialization, speculation, and investment to changing dynamics of health, medicine, healing, and the generation of medical knowledge. Course time will also be devoted to independent research through which students will develop and write up a research paper on an area of interest related to the course theme.
                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                  STSC 003-401 TECHNOLOGY & SOCIETY BENSON, ETIENNE TR 1200PM-0130PM Technology plays an increasing role in our understandings of ourselves, our communities, and our societies, in how we think about politics and war, science and religion, work and play. Humans have made and used technologies, though, for thousands if not millions of years. In this course, we will use this history as a resource to understand how technolgoeis affect social relations, and coversely how the culture of a society shapes the technologies it produces. Do different technolgoeis produce or result from different economic systems like feudalism, capitalism and communism? Can specific technologies promote democratic or authoritarian politics? Do they suggest or enforce different patterns of race, class or gender relations? Among the technologies we'll consider will be large objects like cathedrals, bridges, and airplanes; small ones like guns, clocks and birth control pills; and networks like the electrical grid, the highway system and the internet.
                                                    Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
                                                    STSC 135-401 Modern Biology and Social Implications CECCATTI, JOHN TR 0600PM-0730PM This course covers the history of biology in the 19th and 20th centuries, giving equal consideration to three dominant themes: evolutionary biology, classical genetics, and molecular biology. The course is intended for students with some background in the history of science as well as in biology, although no specific knowledge of either subject in required. We will have three main goals: first, to delineate the content of the leading biological theories and experimental practices of the past two centuries; second, to situate these theories and practices in their historical context, noting the complex interplay between them and the dominant social, political, and economic trends; and, third, to critically evaluate various methodological approaches to the history of science.
                                                      Nat Sci & Math Sector (new curriculum only) NATURAL SCIENCE & MATH SECTOR
                                                      STSC 160-401 INFORMATION AGE DICK, STEPHANIE TR 0130PM-0300PM Certain new technologies are greeted with claims that, for good or ill, they must transform our society. The two most recent: the computer and the Internet. But the series of social, economic and technological developments that underlie what is often called the Information Revolution include much more than just the computer. In this course, we explore the history of information technology and its role in contemporary society. We will explore both the technologies themselves--calculating machines, punched card tabulators, telegraph and telephone networks, differential analyzers, digital computers, and many others--and their larger social, economic and political contexts. To understand the roots of these ideas we look at the prehistory of the computer, at the idea of the post-industrial or information society, at parallels with earlier technologies and at broad historical currents in the United States and the world.
                                                        Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                                        STSC 202-401 SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION VOELKEL, JAMES R 0130PM-0430PM During the 16th and 17th centuries, something that resembled modern science emerged from something that did not. Though the nature and cause of that transition are contested, there were unquestionably many pivotal developments in the content and conduct of science, and it is in this period that many of the 'founding' figures of science, from Copernicus to Galileo to Newton, are identified. This course will examine the many elements that went into the transition, including the revolution in cosmology, the revolt against ancient natural philosophy, the rise of experimentalism, the new philosophies of inquiry, new social structures for natural inquiry and the conceptual foundations of classical physics.
                                                          STSC 208-001 SCI & RELIG GLOBAL PERSP KUCUK, BEKIR MW 1100AM-1200PM This survey course provides a thematic overview of science and religion from antiquity to the present. We will treat well-known historical episodes, such as the emergence of Muslim theology, the Galileo Affair and Darwinism, but also look beyond them. This course is designed to cover all major faith traditions across the globe as well as non-traditional belief systems such as the New Age movement and modern Atheism
                                                            SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                            STSC 209-401 Race and Gender in Global Science GIL-RIANO, JUAN T 0130PM-0430PM This course critically examines the creation of scientific conceptions of 'race' and 'sex' in the modern era and their global impact. How did 'race' and 'sex' come to be the primary categories through which human variation has been classified in the modern West? What concepts of "race" and "sex" did colonial scientists, doctors, naturalists, and other experts invent, and how and why did they do this? How have scientific conceptions of 'race' and 'sex' been adapted to fit the sociopolitical projects of formerly colonized regions? And how have recent developments in genomic science sought to reinvent these categories? With these questions in mind, this course challenges us to think critically about the political contexts in which conceptions of 'race' an'sex' have been crafted as well as how they have been contested and re-defined.
                                                              STSC 260-301 CYBERCULTURE DICK, STEPHANIE W 0200PM-0500PM Computers and the internet have beome critical parts of our lives and culture. In this course, we will explore how people use these new technologies to develop new conceptions of identify, build virtual communities and affect political change. Each week we'll see what we can learn by thinking about the internet in a different way, focusing successively on hackers, virtuality, community, sovreignty, interfaces, algorithms and infrastructure. We'll read books, articles, and blogs about historical and contemporary cultures of computing, from Spacewar players and phone phreaks in the 1970s to Google, Facebook, World of Warcraft, WikiLeaks, and Anonymous today. In addition, we'll explore some of these online communities and projects ourselves and develop our own analyses of them.
                                                                STSC 309-301 SCI FI MOVIES EAST/WEST CANCELED What is the science fiction (SF) movie? How did SF movies and development of science and technology influence each other during the twentieth century? What is the use of SF movies for societies? And why are SF movies much more popular in some countries than in others? By watching and analyzing classic and contemporary SF movies from the US, the Soviet Union, Japan, China, and other countries, we will search for answers to these questions. Special emphasis will be given to analyzing how historical, political, and cultural environments in different countries have influenced the production and acceptance of SF movies.
                                                                  STSC 315-401 THEORIES OF COLOR: IDEAS AND CONTEXT BAKER, TAWRIN MW 0200PM-0330PM In this course we will investigate ideas about color and color practices from antiquity to the nineteenth century. Our historical survey will follow three intertwined threads. We will examine physical color theories, nanely, what various writers thought color was in things themselves and how color was related to light. We will study anatomical and physiological accounts of the eye, especially the way in which ocular anatomy was intimately tied to ideas about color. And we will trace the history of color technology, namely, how people in the past have struggled to bring color under control. As a part of this we will study the long history of alchemy, which was in a sense born out of attempts to mimic precious stones and metals - especially their color - and we will touch on the closely related histories of dyeing, pigments, and painting. When possible we will reproduce notable historical anatomies, particularly the anatomical procedures of Galen, Vesalius, and others, and we will also replicate some key historical experiences and experiments concerning color.
                                                                    STSC 325-401 PHIL OF SCIENCE DOMOTOR, ZOLTAN MW 0330PM-0500PM This self-contained course (presupposing no substantive prior background in philosophy nor any extensive knowledge of science) provides an advanced introduction to the central philosophical questions concerning the nature of scientific knowledge and its relation to experience, and the metaphysical assumptions underlying the natural sciences. Topics to be covered include: science versus pseudoscience, laws of nature, causation, determinism and randomness, theories and models in science, scientific explanation, under-determination of theories by observation and measurement, realism and antirealism, reductionism and inter-theory relations, objectivity and value judgments in science, hypothesis testing and confirmation of scientific theories, and classical paradoxes in scientific methodology.
                                                                      STSC 338-401 Hybrid Science: Nature, health, and society in Latin America GIL-RIANO, JUAN R 0130PM-0430PM What role did science and medicine play in the creation and growth of the Spanish and Portuguese empires? And why was the creation of science and health institutions crucial to the revolutionary movements for independence in Latin America? This course examines science and medicine in Latin America by attending to the ways that knowledge of nature and health has been central to the political struggles of the countries in this region. A crucial dynamic shaping the history and culture of this region is the interplay between the healing practices and cosmologies of European settlers, indigenous Americans, and the descendants of African slaves. Bearing this interplay in mind, this course explores how Latin America has been a fertile site of scientific creativity. It also examines the ways in which Latin American scientists and medical experts have refashioned concepts and practices from Europe and North America to fit local circumstances.
                                                                        STSC 362-301 WATERS, ROADS AND WIRES GREENE, ANN TR 1200PM-0130PM This course studies infrastructures: how and why they develop, how they are maintained, how they reshape environments, and how they interconnect with other infrastructures. We begin by reading about infrastructure and about large technological systems, then explore some specific American structures. Possible topics: the electrical grid, the interstate highway system, hydroelectric dams, Amtrak, urban mass transit systems, disasters and infrastructure (Katrina, Harvey, etc.). As the semester progresses, students will spend more time in class on individual research topics of their choice, and in working groups producing a group project.
                                                                          STSC 370-401 THE MANY LIVES OF DATA BERGMAN, JAMES TR 0300PM-0430PM This is a class about the live(s) and afterlives of information from 1850 to the present. Not only can information be reproduced (in a variety of material conditions); it can be repurposed and funneled through a variety of different applications, some of them serving radically different purposes than the first purpose of gathering it. Thoreau's journals of plant flowering, for instance, have become important indicators of climate change. More controversial is the sale of biomedical information by personal genomics services for drug discovery, or the construction of forensic databases consisting of the DNA of suspects arrested as a result of racial profiling. We will study the ways in which data has become a way for us to understand and define change, stability, place, and time, beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, a period of accelerated and increasingly systematic gathering of data,particularly medical, forensic, and environmental data. The class will proceed both chronologically and thematically in three units, from the gathering and use of biomedical data as a way to make patient populations "legible" (to borrow from James Scott), to data as a way to make the environment understandable, and finally to data as a tool for producing and reproducing social relations. As a final project, students will trace a particular data set from its original gathering to its latest usage. Students will also have an opportunity to create their own course content in the final three weeks of class.
                                                                            STSC 400-301 STSC SEMINAR KUCUK, BEKIR W 0200PM-0500PM This is a capstone seminar for STSC maors, and a required seminar for any STSC junior who wishes to write a senior thesis for honors in the major. It is designed to provide the tools necessary to undertake original research by guiding students through the research and writing process. Students will produce either a polished proposal for a senior thesis project, or a completed research paper by the end of the term. Although each student will work on a different topic, the class will focus on general aspects of historical, and social scientific research and guide students through a close reading of key texts in science and technology studies.
                                                                              STSC 411-401 SPORT SCIENCE & MEDICINE JOHNSON, ANDRIA TR 1030AM-1200PM Why did Lance Armstrong get caught? Why do Kenyans win marathons? Does Gatorade really work? In this course, we won't answer these questions ourselves but will rely upon the methods of history, sociology, and anthropology to explore the world of the sport scientists who do. Sport scientists produce knowledge about how human bodies work and the intricacies of human performance. They bring elite (world-class) athletes to their laboratories-or their labs to the athletes. Through readings, discussions, and original research, we will find out how these scientists determine the boundary between "natural" and "performance-enhanced," work to conquer the problem of fatigue, and establish the limits and potential of human beings. Course themes include: technology in science and sport, the lab vs. the field, genetics and race, the politics of the body, and doping. Course goals include: 1) reading scientific and medical texts critically, and assessing their social, cultural, and political origins and ramifications; 2) pursuing an in-depth The course fulfills the Capstone requirement for the HSOC/STSC majors. Semester-long research projects will focus on "un-black-boxing" the metrics sport scientists and physicians use to categorize athletes' bodies as "normal" or "abnormal." For example, you may investigate the test(s) used to define whether an athlete is male or female, establish whether an athlete's blood is "too" oxygenated, or assess whether an athlete is "too" fast (false start). Requirements therefore include: weekly readings and participation in online and in-class discussions; sequenced research assignments; peer review; and a final 20+page original research paper and presentation.
                                                                                STSC 454-401 MILITARY MEDICINE & TECH CARUSO, DAVID TR 0130PM-0300PM War and its effects on the human body are brutal; the carnage of the battlefield and the conditions of camp life have presented special challenges to medicine throughout history. People and governments have sought to quell carnage and deter war through the development of ever-more-lethal technologies, though, in the end, they mostly created more spectacular ways of maiming flesh. But the significance of medicine and technology in a military context extends well beyond the injuries and illnesses of war. Looking more closely at the ways in which engineers, physicians, inventors, military officers, soldiers, and civilians have interacted with each other both in war and in peace reveals much about the political, cultural, and disciplinary formation of military medicine and technology in the modern era. This seminar surveys the history of medicine, technology, nursing, innovation, and public health as they are conducted in a military context, exploring the ways in which the practices, theories, tools and imagined needs of the military have played, and continue to play, a prominent role in conceptualizations of warfare morality, the body, and ethics.
                                                                                  STSC 482-401 INVISIBLE LABOR HUM SCI: Invisible Labor in the Human Sciences KAPLAN, JUDITH MW 0200PM-0330PM This course looks at those disciplines that take people as their subjects of research--including biology and biomedicine as well as anthropology, linguistics, and sociology--to explore the contributions of a wide range of research participants. We will focus on the sciences of human behavior, information, and medicine to analyze the labors of behind-the-scenes actors including tissue donors, survey respondents, student subjects, patients, translators, activists, ethics review boards, data curators, and archivists. Our job will be to analyze the experiences of these technoscientific laborers with a view to systems of knowledge and poer in the production and maintenance of knowledge about humans and their bodies.