Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
HSOC 003-401 Technology & Society Adelheid Clara Voskuhl TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Technology plays an increasing role in our understandings of ourselves, our communities, and our societies, in how we think about politics and war, science and religion, work and play. Humans have made and used technologies, though, for thousands if not millions of years. In this course, we will use this history as a resource to understand how technolgoeis affect social relations, and coversely how the culture of a society shapes the technologies it produces. Do different technologies produce or result from different economic systems like feudalism, capitalism and communism? Can specific technologies promote democratic or authoritarian politics? Do they suggest or enforce different patterns of race, class or gender relations? Among the technologies we'll consider will be large objects like cathedrals, bridges, and airplanes; small ones like guns, clocks and birth control pills; and networks like the electrical grid, the highway system and the internet. SOCI033401, STSC003401 Society sector (all classes)
HSOC 010-001 Health & Societies Ramah Katherine Mckay MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM "Two fundamental questions structure this course: (1)What kinds of factors shape population health in various parts of the world in the twenty-first century? and (2)What kinds of intellectual tools are necessary in order to study global health? Grasping the deeper "socialness" of health and health care in a variety of cultures and time periods requires a sustained interdisciplinary approach. "Health and Societies: Global Perspectives" blends the methods of history, sociology, anthropology and related disciplines in order to expose the layers of causation and meaning beneath what we often see as straightforward, common-sense responses to bioloogical phenomena. Assignments throughout the semester provide a hands-on introduction to research strageties in these core disciplines. The course culminates with pragmatic, student-led assessments of global health policies designed to identify creative and cost effective solutions to the most persistent health problems in the world today." Also fulfills General Requirement in Science Studies for Class of 2009 and prior. Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) Humanities & Social Science Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
HSOC 100-401 Introduction To Sociological Research Melissa J. Wilde MW 02:00 PM-03:00 PM One of the defining chnaracteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitmenmt to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projets utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strenths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. SOCI100401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
HSOC 102-401 Bioethics Meghan L Crnic MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM This course is intended to introduce students to the fundamental principles of bioethics and the many ethical issues that arise in the rapidly changing fields of biomedicine and the life sciences. The first half of the course will provide an overview of the standard philosophical principles of bioethics, using clinical case studies to help illustrate and work through these principles. In the second half of the course we will focus on recent biomedical topics that have engendered much public controversy including diagnostic genetics, reproductive technologies and prenatal screening, abortion, physician assisted suicide, human experiments, and end of life decision making. We will use the principles learned in the first half of the course to systematically think through these bioethical issues, many of which affect our everyday lives. SOCI101401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
HSOC 110-401 Science & Literature Kathryn N Dorsch TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course will explore the emergence of modern science fiction as a genre and the ways it has reflected our evolving conceptions of ourselves and the universe. We will explore sci-fi as not only the future-mythos of a technological civilization, but as a space for cultural, social, and political critique of the modern age. We will discuss such characteristic themes as utopias, the exploration of space and time, biological engineering, robots, aliens, and other worlds, contextualized within the history of science and alongside themes like gender, race, and class. Authors include: H. G. Wells, Le Guin, Herbert, Clarke, Asimov, Okafor, Delany, Chiang, and others. STSC110401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
HSOC 111-401 Health of Populations Irma Elo MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM This course develops some of the major measures used to assess the health of populations and uses those measures to consider the major factors that determine levels of health in large aggregates. These factors include disease environment, medical technology, public health initiatives, and personal behaviors. The approach is comparative and historical and includes attention to differences in health levels among major social groups. SOCI111401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
HSOC 112-001 The Peoples Health Elaine Lafay MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM While the scary threats of the moment in recent years, Ebola, MERS, swine flu, bioterrorism dominate media coverage of public health, most human suffering anddeath are driven by more mundane causes. This course critically addresses twenty-first-century public health science and policy by examining the long history (beginning with the plague epidemics of Renaissance Italy) that brought us to where we are today. Topics include responses to epidemics; socioeconomic, racial, and other disparities in health; occupational health; the rise of public health as a field of scientific inquiry; sanitary reform; the Bacteriological Revolution; the shift from disease causes to risk factors; and the social determinants of health. Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
HSOC 216-301 Gender and Health Elaine Lafay TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Women's health is a constant refrain of modern life, prompting impassioned debates that speak to the fundamental nature of our society. Women's bodies are the tableaux across which politicians, physicians, healthcare professional, activists, and women themselves dispute issues as wide-ranging as individual versus collective rights, the legitimacy of scientific and medical knowledge, the role of the government in healthcare, inequalities of care, and the value of experiential knowledge, among many others. Understanding the history of these questions is crucial for informed engagement with contemporary issues.
HSOC 219-401 Race, Sci, & Global Juan Sebastian Gil-Riano TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course examines how the practice of sorting humans into distinct races is connected to the rise of modern science and to the economic globalization sparked by Columbus' arrival in the Americas in 1492. By examining the trajectory of race in science from the Iberian conquest of the Americas until the present, we will examine the ways in which colonial logics and structures persist into the present and the ways they've been disrupted by various revolutionary, anti-colonial, and anti-racist movements. Along the way, we will observe how cultural ideas about race have been woven into the conceptual fabric of modern scientific disciplines such as anthropology, biology, psychology, and sociology and how these disciplines have sought to redeem themselves from their racist pasts. STSC219401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) Humanities & Social Science Sector https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020A&course=HSOC219401
HSOC 231-401 Insect Epidemiology Michael Z. Levy TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Malaria, Chagas disease, the Plague--some of the most deadly and widespread infectious diseases are carried by insects. The insects are also pernicious pests; bed bugs have returned from obscurity to wreak havoc on communities, invasive species decimate agricultural production and threaten forests across the United States. At the same time declines among the insects on which we depend--the honeybees and other pollinators--threaten our food security, while general declines of insects threaten ecosystems. We will study the areas where the insects and humans cross paths and explore how our interactions with insects can be cause, consequence or symptom of much broader issues. This course is not an entomology course but will cover a lot about insects. It is not a traditional epidemiology course but will explore the approaches and study designs that epidemiologists use to uncover associations and evaluate interventions. It is not a history course but will cover past epidemics and infestations that have changed the course of the history and reversed advancing armies. STSC231401
HSOC 239-601 Global Health: Anthropological Perspectives Michael B Joiner W 05:00 PM-08:00 PM In some parts of the world spending on pharmaceuticals is astronomical. In others, people struggle for survival amid new and reemerging epidemics and have little or no access to basic or life-saving therapies. Treatments for infectious diseases that disproportionately affect the world's poor remain under-researched and global health disparities are increasing. This interdisciplinary seminar integrates perspectives from the social sciences and the biomedical sciences to explore 1) the development and global flows of medical technologies; 2) how the health of individuals and groups is affected by medical technologies, public policy, and the forces of globalization as each of these impacts local worlds. The seminar is structured to allow us to examine specific case material from around the world (Haiti, South Africa, Brazil, Russia, China, India, for example), and to address the ways in which social, political-economic, and technological factors -- which are increasingly global in nature -- influence basic biological mechanisms and disease outcomes and distribution. As we analyze each case and gain familiarity with ethnographic methods, we will ask how more effective interventions can be formulated. The course draws from historical and ethnographic accounts, medical journals, ethical analyses, and films, and familiarizes students with critical debates on globalization and with local responses to globalizing processes. ANTH273601
HSOC 251-001 Founda of Public Health TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM Many factors have shaped, and continue to shape, population health and public health policy. This course will explore the concept, mission, and core functions of public health. Students will have a chance to learn about its key methodological (epidemiology, biostatistics) and content (environmental health, social and behavioral sciences, health policy) areas. In addition, we will focus on topics of particular relevance to the current health of the public; topics likely will include the basics of life (food, water, and shelter) and topics of current interest (e.g., motor vehicle crashes, mental health, violence).
HSOC 260-301 Soc Determinants Hlth: Social Determinants of Health Andria B. Johnson TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Over the last century, we have witnessed dramatic historical change in population health, e.g. rising numbeers of obese Americans and dramatic declines in death from stomach cancer. There has also been highly visible social patterning of health and disease, such as socio-economic disparities in AIDS, substance abuse, and asthma in the U.S. to day or the association of breat cancer with affluence around the world. This course will explore the way researchers and others in past and present have tried to make sense of these patterns and do something about them. The course is historical and sociological. We will examine evidence and theories about how poverty, affluence and other social factors influence health AND we will examine how social and historical forces shape the ways in which health and disease are understood.
HSOC 271-401 Greek & Roman Medicine Ralph Rosen TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course will examine the ways in which the Greeks, and then the Romans, conceptualized the body, disease, and healing, and will compare these to medical culture of our time. We will consider sources from Hippocrates, Plato, and Aristotle to Galen and Soranus, and will juxtapose these writings with modern discourse about similar topics. We will also pay some attention to ancient pharmacology and religious healing, and will visit the Penn Museum to see their collection of ancient medical instruments. All readings will be in English and no previous background in Classical Studies is required. This course will be especially appealing (and useful) to Pre-med and Nursing students, and to students interested in the History of Science, Ancient Philosophy, and Classics. CLST271401
HSOC 277-401 Mental Illness Jason S Schnittker MWF 10:00 AM-11:00 AM This course is designed to give a general overview of how sociologists study mental health and illness. We will be concerned with describing the contributions of sociological research and exploring how these contributions differ from those of other disciplines, including psychology, psychology, psychiatry, and social work. This overview will be done in three parts: we will discuss (1) what "mental illness" is, (2) how social factors (e.g. social networks) shape mental illness, and (3) how we as a society respond to and treat the mentally ill. Throughout the course, we will be concerned with unvcovering the assumptions behind definitions underlying mental "health" and exploring these assumptions political, social and legal implications. SOCI277401
HSOC 338-401 Hybrid Science Juan Sebastian Gil-Riano TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM What role did science and medicine play in the creation and growth of the Spanish and Portuguese empires? And why was the creation of science and health institutions crucial to the revolutionary movements for independence in Latin America? This course examines science and medicine in Latin America by attending to the ways that knowledge of nature and health has been central to the political struggles of the countries in this region. A crucial dynamic shaping the history and culture of this region is the interplay between the healing practices and cosmologies of European settlers, indigenous Americans, and the descendants of African slaves. Bearing this interplay in mind, this course explores how Latin America has been a fertile site of scientific creativity. It also examines the ways in which Latin American scientists and medical experts have refashioned concepts and practices from Europe and North America to fit local circumstances. STSC338401
HSOC 409-401 Science and Disability Jessica Martucci W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM How have ideas about ability and disability shaped the questions we ask about the world and the methods we use to answer them? How do assumptions about who can and ought to be a scientist, engineer, or physician intersect with constructions of disability and difference? How might studying the lived experiences of people with disabilities in the context of STEM(Medicine) help us begin to answer these questions? This course explores the exciting intersection between disability studies and the history and sociology of science and medicine through weekly readings, discussions, and original research. Using materials ranging from archival and online sources to oral history interviews and museum collections, students in this course will learn how scientific ideas and institutions have helped shape 20th- and 21st-century categories and experiences of disability as an embodied and socio-political identity. At the same time, students will learn how to use disability as a critical theoretical lens for investigating the cultures, tools, and institutions behind the creation and application of modern scientific and medical knowledge. Collaborative and analytical writing work throughout the course will build towards the completion of a final original research project. STSC409401
HSOC 411-401 Sport Science & Medicine Andria B. Johnson TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Why did Lance Armstrong get caught? Why do Kenyans win marathons? Does Gatorade really work? In this course, we won't answer these questions ourselves but will rely upon the methods of history, sociology, and anthropology to explore the world of the sport scientists who do. Sport scientists produce knowledge about how human bodies work and the intricacies of human performance. They bring elite (world-class) athletes to their laboratories-or their labs to the athletes. Through readings, discussions, and original research, we will find out how these scientists determine the boundary between "natural" and "performance-enhanced," work to conquer the problem of fatigue, and establish the limits and potential of human beings. Course themes include: technology in science and sport, the lab vs. the field, genetics and race, the politics of the body, and doping. Course goals include: 1) reading scientific and medical texts critically, and assessing their social, cultural, and political origins and ramifications; 2) pursuing an in-depth The course fulfills the Capstone requirement for the HSOC/STSC majors. Semester-long research projects will focus on "un-black-boxing" the metrics sport scientists and physicians use to categorize athletes' bodies as "normal" or "abnormal." For example, you may investigate the test(s) used to define whether an athlete is male or female, establish whether an athlete's blood is "too" oxygenated, or assess whether an athlete is "too" fast (false start). Requirements therefore include: weekly readings and participation in online and in-class discussions; sequenced research assignments; peer review; and a final 20+page original research paper and presentation. STSC411401
HSOC 420-301 Res Sem Health & Society: Research Seminar Health and Society Meghan L Crnic R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This course is designed to provide HSOC students with the tools necessary to undertake original research, guiding them through the research and writing process. Students will produce either a polished proposal for a senior thesis project, or, if there is room inthe course, a completed research paper by the end of term. Students work individually, in small groups and under the close supervision of a faculty member to establish feasible research topics, develop effective research and writing strategies, analyze primary and secondary sources, and provide critiques of classmates'drafts. Students must apply for this couse by December 1. Permission Needed From Instructor
HSOC 430-301 Disease & Society Robert A. Aronowitz T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM What is disease? In this seminar students will ask and answer this question by analyzing historical documents, scientific reports, and historical scholarship (primarily 19th and 20th century U.S. and European). We will look at disease from multiple perspectives -- as a biological process, clinical entity, population phenomenon, historical actor and personal experience. We will pay special attention to how diseases have been recognized, diagnosed, named and classified in different eras, cultures and professional settings.
HSOC 454-401 Military Medicine & Tech David J. Caruso TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM War and its effects on the human body are brutal; the carnage of the battlefield and the conditions of camp life have presented special challenges to medicine throughout history. People and governments have sought to quell carnage and deter war through the development of ever-more-lethal technologies, though, in the end, they mostly created more spectacular ways of maiming flesh. But the significance of medicine and technology in a military context extends well beyond the injuries and illnesses of war. Looking more closely at the ways in which engineers, physicians, inventors, military officers, soldiers, and civilians have interacted with each other both in war and in peace reveals much about the political, cultural, and disciplinary formation of military medicine and technology in the modern era. This seminar surveys the history of medicine, technology, nursing, innovation, and public health as they are conducted in a military context, exploring the ways in which the practices, theories, tools and imagined needs of the military have played, and continue to play, a prominent role in conceptualizations of warfare morality, the body, and ethics. STSC454401
HSSC 518-301 Botanic Empires Projit Bihari Mukharji T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Tea, rubber, cinchona, sugar and myriad other plants that have and continue to shape our contemporary world have been moved, altered and exploited by modern empires. With the rise of new forms of Biopiracy, older connections between plants and imperialism are being rethought not just academically but in multiple new practical, commercial and political arenas. Looking back from this contemporary vantage point, this course will explore the sites, sciences and instruments through which plants and empire came to be so intimately entangled. Topics shall range from the histories of botanic gardens to botanic illustrations and agricultural experimental stations to botanic horror fiction.
HSSC 568-301 Minds and Machines Stephanie A Dick W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM There is a plaque at Dartmouth College that reads: "In this building during the summer of 1956 John McCarthy (Dartmouth College), Marvin L. Minsky (MIT), Nathaniel Rochester (IBM), and Claude Shannon (Bell Laboratories) conducted the Dartmouth Summer Research Project on Artificial Intelligence as a research discipline to proceed on the basis of the conjecture that every aspect of learning or any other feature of intelligence can in principle be so precisely described that a machine can be made to simulate it." The plaque was hung in 2006, in conjunction with a conference commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Summer Research Project, and it enshrines the standard myth that Artificial Intelligence was born in 1955 when these veterans of early military computing applied to the Rockefeller Foundation for a summer grant to fund the workshop that in turn shaped the field. However, like so many myths, this one obfuscates the long-entangled histories that have come together in contemporary Artificial Intelligence research -- including histories of labor, histories of automation, histories of intelligence, histories of mathematics, and histories of technology. This course surveys the historical scholarship that has investigated the intersections of minds and machines.
HSSC 609-301 Feminist Sts Ramah Katherine Mckay R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Drawing from historical, anthropological, and ethnographic texts, this course draws from core readings in feminist theory and feminist STS as well as from decolonial and postcolonial perspectives. We will examine feminist ethnographic, historical, and science studies approaches to science, knowledge production, and governance. Course readings will be organized around themes or cases and key questions will include the politics and limits of relation as an organizing analytical, methodological, and political concept.
STSC 003-401 Technology & Society Adelheid Clara Voskuhl TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Technology plays an increasing role in our understandings of ourselves, our communities, and our societies, in how we think about politics and war, science and religion, work and play. Humans have made and used technologies, though, for thousands if not millions of years. In this course, we will use this history as a resource to understand how technolgoeis affect social relations, and coversely how the culture of a society shapes the technologies it produces. Do different technolgoeis produce or result from different economic systems like feudalism, capitalism and communism? Can specific technologies promote democratic or authoritarian politics? Do they suggest or enforce different patterns of race, class or gender relations? Among the technologies we'll consider will be large objects like cathedrals, bridges, and airplanes; small ones like guns, clocks and birth control pills; and networks like the electrical grid, the highway system and the internet. SOCI033401, HSOC003401 Society sector (all classes)
STSC 110-401 Science & Literature Kathryn N Dorsch TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course will explore the emergence of modern science fiction as a genre and the ways it has reflected our evolving conceptions of ourselves and the universe. We will explore sci-fi as not only the future-mythos of a technological civilization, but as a space for cultural, social, and political critique of the modern age. We will discuss such characteristic themes as utopias, the exploration of space and time, biological engineering, robots, aliens, and other worlds, contextualized within the history of science and alongside themes like gender, race, and class. Authors include: H. G. Wells, Le Guin, Herbert, Clarke, Asimov, Okafor, Delany, Chiang, and others. HSOC110401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
STSC 118-401 Adv Journalistic Writing: Science/Technolgy/Societ Peter J Tarr T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM A workshop in creative writing devoted to original student work in journalism. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. This course is a writing workshop in which we contemplate the future of our fragile planet. Each student will engage with key issues facing society in the Anthropocene—the geologic epoch in which humans have come to recognize their own decisive impact on processes such as climate and evolution that until recently have been considered phenomena of "nature." You will tackle issues that are front-page news, in formats that range from the hard-news "science" story to the op-ed and editorial, to the journalistic profile. You will develop and argue fact-based opinion pieces on such questions as: Should we let some endangered species die out? Should genetic engineers proceed with research on the editing of human germline cells? Is it ethical to attempt to geo-engineer the climate, and if so, at what point in the current warming cycle? More generally: can or should we ever seek to impose limits or controls on scientific research and discovery? In addition to a 2,000-word profile of a scientist or tech developer at work in his/her lab, you will write and rewrite three op-eds and a personal essay over the course of the term, and submit revised drafts in a final portfolio at the end of the term. ENGL158401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020A&course=STSC118401
STSC 135-401 Modern Biology and Social Implications John Ceccatti TR 06:00 PM-07:30 PM This course covers the history of biology in the 19th and 20th centuries, giving equal consideration to three dominant themes: evolutionary biology, classical genetics, and molecular biology. The course is intended for students with some background in the history of science as well as in biology, although no specific knowledge of either subject in required. We will have three main goals: first, to delineate the content of the leading biological theories and experimental practices of the past two centuries; second, to situate these theories and practices in their historical context, noting the complex interplay between them and the dominant social, political, and economic trends; and, third, to critically evaluate various methodological approaches to the history of science. HIST035401 Nat Sci & Math Sector (new curriculum only) Natural Science & Math Sector
STSC 160-401 Information Age Stephanie A Dick TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Certain new technologies are greeted with claims that, for good or ill, they must transform our society. The two most recent: the computer and the Internet. But the series of social, economic and technological developments that underlie what is often called the Information Revolution include much more than just the computer. In this course, we explore the history of information technology and its role in contemporary society. We will explore both the technologies themselves--calculating machines, punched card tabulators, telegraph and telephone networks, differential analyzers, digital computers, and many others--and their larger social, economic and political contexts. To understand the roots of these ideas we look at the prehistory of the computer, at the idea of the post-industrial or information society, at parallels with earlier technologies and at broad historical currents in the United States and the world. SOCI161401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) Humanities & Social Science Sector
STSC 219-401 Race, Sci, & Global Juan Sebastian Gil-Riano TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course examines how the practice of sorting humans into distinct races is connected to the rise of modern science and to the economic globalization sparked by Columbus' arrival in the Americas in 1492. By examining the trajectory of race in science from the Iberian conquest of the Americas until the present, we will examine the ways in which colonial logics and structures persist into the present and the ways they've been disrupted by various revolutionary, anti-colonial, and anti-racist movements. Along the way, we will observe how cultural ideas about race have been woven into the conceptual fabric of modern scientific disciplines such as anthropology, biology, psychology, and sociology and how these disciplines have sought to redeem themselves from their racist pasts. HSOC219401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) Humanities & Social Science Sector https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020A&course=STSC219401
STSC 231-401 Insect Epidemiology Michael Z. Levy TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Malaria, Chagas disease, the Plague--some of the most deadly and widespread infectious diseases are carried by insects. The insects are also pernicious pests; bed bugs have returned from obscurity to wreak havoc on communities, invasive species decimate agricultural production and threaten forests across the United States. At the same time declines among the insects on which we depend--the honeybees and other pollinators--threaten our food security, while general declines of insects threaten ecosystems. We will study the areas where the insects and humans cross paths and explore how our interactions with insects can be cause, consequence or symptom of much broader issues. This course is not an entomology course but will cover a lot about insects. It is not a traditional epidemiology course but will explore the approaches and study designs that epidemiologists use to uncover associations and evaluate interventions. It is not a history course but will cover past epidemics and infestations that have changed the course of the history and reversed advancing armies. HSOC231401
STSC 321-301 Weird Science Kathryn N Dorsch TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM What do we mean by "science"? How did we come to agree on a common definition? Do we agree on a common definition? What about when we don't? This course explores histories of heterodox science and the construction of sciences and pseudosciences. In doing so, we will focus on expertise, authority, and legitimacy in science, as well as public consumption of science. This course will also introduce students to fundamental questions in the philosophy of science, as well as offering instruction in reading and methods of historiography. Topics include: phrenology, parapsychology, cryptozoology, UFOs, climate change denial.
STSC 338-301 Hybrid Science Juan Sebastian Gil-Riano TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM What role did science and medicine play in the creation and growth of the Spanish and Portuguese empires? And why was the creation of science and health institutions crucial to the revolutionary movements for independence in Latin America? This course examines science and medicine in Latin America by attending to the ways that knowledge of nature and health has been central to the political struggles of the countries in this region. A crucial dynamic shaping the history and culture of this region is the interplay between the healing practices and cosmologies of European settlers, indigenous Americans, and the descendants of African slaves. Bearing this interplay in mind, this course explores how Latin America has been a fertile site of scientific creativity. It also examines the ways in which Latin American scientists and medical experts have refashioned concepts and practices from Europe and North America to fit local circumstances. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020A&course=STSC338301
STSC 338-401 Hybrid Science Juan Sebastian Gil-Riano TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM What role did science and medicine play in the creation and growth of the Spanish and Portuguese empires? And why was the creation of science and health institutions crucial to the revolutionary movements for independence in Latin America? This course examines science and medicine in Latin America by attending to the ways that knowledge of nature and health has been central to the political struggles of the countries in this region. A crucial dynamic shaping the history and culture of this region is the interplay between the healing practices and cosmologies of European settlers, indigenous Americans, and the descendants of African slaves. Bearing this interplay in mind, this course explores how Latin America has been a fertile site of scientific creativity. It also examines the ways in which Latin American scientists and medical experts have refashioned concepts and practices from Europe and North America to fit local circumstances. HSOC338401
STSC 400-301 Research Seminar Ann Norton Greene R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This is a capstone seminar for STSC maors, and a required seminar for any STSC junior who wishes to write a senior thesis for honors in the major. It is designed to provide the tools necessary to undertake original research by guiding students through the research and writing process. Students will produce either a polished proposal for a senior thesis project, or a completed research paper by the end of the term. Although each student will work on a different topic, the class will focus on general aspects of historical, and social scientific research and guide students through a close reading of key texts in science and technology studies.
STSC 409-401 Science and Disability Jessica Martucci W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM How have ideas about ability and disability shaped the questions we ask about the world and the methods we use to answer them? How do assumptions about who can and ought to be a scientist, engineer, or physician intersect with constructions of disability and difference? How might studying the lived experiences of people with disabilities in the context of STEM(Medicine) help us begin to answer these questions? This course explores the exciting intersection between disability studies and the history and sociology of science and medicine through weekly readings, discussions, and original research. Using materials ranging from archival and online sources to oral history interviews and museum collections, students in this course will learn how scientific ideas and institutions have helped shape 20th- and 21st-century categories and experiences of disability as an embodied and socio-political identity. At the same time, students will learn how to use disability as a critical theoretical lens for investigating the cultures, tools, and institutions behind the creation and application of modern scientific and medical knowledge. Collaborative and analytical writing work throughout the course will build towards the completion of a final original research project. HSOC409401
STSC 411-401 Sport Science & Medicine Andria B. Johnson TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Why did Lance Armstrong get caught? Why do Kenyans win marathons? Does Gatorade really work? In this course, we won't answer these questions ourselves but will rely upon the methods of history, sociology, and anthropology to explore the world of the sport scientists who do. Sport scientists produce knowledge about how human bodies work and the intricacies of human performance. They bring elite (world-class) athletes to their laboratories-or their labs to the athletes. Through readings, discussions, and original research, we will find out how these scientists determine the boundary between "natural" and "performance-enhanced," work to conquer the problem of fatigue, and establish the limits and potential of human beings. Course themes include: technology in science and sport, the lab vs. the field, genetics and race, the politics of the body, and doping. Course goals include: 1) reading scientific and medical texts critically, and assessing their social, cultural, and political origins and ramifications; 2) pursuing an in-depth The course fulfills the Capstone requirement for the HSOC/STSC majors. Semester-long research projects will focus on "un-black-boxing" the metrics sport scientists and physicians use to categorize athletes' bodies as "normal" or "abnormal." For example, you may investigate the test(s) used to define whether an athlete is male or female, establish whether an athlete's blood is "too" oxygenated, or assess whether an athlete is "too" fast (false start). Requirements therefore include: weekly readings and participation in online and in-class discussions; sequenced research assignments; peer review; and a final 20+page original research paper and presentation. HSOC411401
STSC 454-401 Military Medicine & Tech David J. Caruso TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM War and its effects on the human body are brutal; the carnage of the battlefield and the conditions of camp life have presented special challenges to medicine throughout history. People and governments have sought to quell carnage and deter war through the development of ever-more-lethal technologies, though, in the end, they mostly created more spectacular ways of maiming flesh. But the significance of medicine and technology in a military context extends well beyond the injuries and illnesses of war. Looking more closely at the ways in which engineers, physicians, inventors, military officers, soldiers, and civilians have interacted with each other both in war and in peace reveals much about the political, cultural, and disciplinary formation of military medicine and technology in the modern era. This seminar surveys the history of medicine, technology, nursing, innovation, and public health as they are conducted in a military context, exploring the ways in which the practices, theories, tools and imagined needs of the military have played, and continue to play, a prominent role in conceptualizations of warfare morality, the body, and ethics. HSOC454401