The formal requirements for the doctorate in our department are:

  • Participation in our introductory methods seminar (HSSC 505) (Fall, year I);
  • A minimum of 18 graduate credits, of which 14 must be in HSSC. This basically means that in your first three years you will be enrolled in at least 18 courses. If you’d like to do more, that’s fine. Especially in your third year, some of those courses may be “999” independent studies for reading courses that essentially prepare you for your orals examination;
  • Three graduate seminars in each of our three major subfields (science, technology, and medicine);
  • One research seminar with a substantial writing project, on which the student receives an A– or better;
  • One seminar dealing primarily with the period before 1850; or a research paper dealing with the period before 1850 even if written for a course that includes materials from a later period;
  • Successful passing of the formal Second Year Evaluation (as required by the University) usually in the first week of May at the end of your second year. This includes one “second year paper”— one of the papers from a seminar that you wish to prepare for eventual publication;
  • Regular participation in departmental life, including participation in the weekly workshop, engagement with the journal club, and active involvement in special meetings, seminars, and other events. Being involved in these activities is a crucial part of your education;
  • Demonstration of proficiency in two languages, one of which may be statistics (this requirement must be met before the Orals Examination may be scheduled);
  • Successful passing of the Orals Examination (usually by the end of your third year), demonstrating mastery of the literature in three special sub-fields, each jointly worked out by the student with a faculty member;
  • A dissertation proposal approved by a student’s adviser within six weeks of passing the Orals;
  • At least two years (4 semesters, or 4 courses) of mentored teaching experience (which may receive course credit, at the student’s discretion);
  • A dissertation, submitted to and accepted and approved by the student’s dissertation committee, usually consisting of three members of the faculty, in accordance with University regulations.